Scottish culture celebrated at An Cultúrlann complex

Participants in the Burns Night celebrations at An Culturlann. Photo: Tom Heaney, nwpresspics
Participants in the Burns Night celebrations at An Culturlann. Photo: Tom Heaney, nwpresspics

There was a great gathering on Friday at An Cultúrlann for a celebration of all things Scottish, to mark Burns night.

Historical links with our Celtic neighbours were marked in fine style with a ‘Not So Serious Burns Night’ celebration staged by Derry City Council’s Community Relations Team in partnership with James Kee and local Ulster-Scots performers.

The event is the biggest cultural night in the Scottish calendar and there was singing, dancing and poetry aplenty for all who attended and, of course, the traditional neeps, tatties and Haggis.

Community Relations Officer with Derry City Council Sue Divin, said the event had been a great success: “I was delighted to see so many people turn out for this cross cultural celebration, which remembers our historical links with Scotland.

“It was an extremely enjoyable and fun way to remember one of the most influential poets from these islands, and to try some traditional Scottish dancing and cuisine. I would like to thank James Kee and all involved in organising and performing for making it such a success.”

Robert Burns was a Scottish poet and lyricist, widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland, and his work is celebrated worldwide.

As well as making original compositions, Burns also collected folk songs from across Scotland, often revising or adapting them. His poem and song ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is often sung at Hogmanay, the last day of the year, while ‘Scots Wha Hae’ served for a long time as an unofficial national anthem of the country. His work is celebrated annually by Scottish people scattered across the globe.