Amelia takes a short cut to fundraising for Princess Trust

Amelia Shipley, centre, who will be having her hair cut at Oakgrove Integrated Primary School today (Wednesday) to raise funds for the Little Princess Trust. Included are Sonia Ratcliffe, left, and Rachel Shipley. Amelia's hair will be used to make a wig for a child who has lost their hair whilst undergoing treatment for cancer. INLS4914-187KM
Amelia Shipley, centre, who will be having her hair cut at Oakgrove Integrated Primary School today (Wednesday) to raise funds for the Little Princess Trust. Included are Sonia Ratcliffe, left, and Rachel Shipley. Amelia's hair will be used to make a wig for a child who has lost their hair whilst undergoing treatment for cancer. INLS4914-187KM

A pupil from Oakgrove Primary School will feel the cold winter wind later today, Wednesday when she leaves school.

The reason is that Amelia Shipley is having her long hair cut off to help other children suffering from hair loss due to cancer treatment they are receiving. So, in the process of gaining a new hairstyle in time for Christmas, Amelia will also be helping to make it a special Christmas for another little girl, who will receive a wig.

Not only is she hoping to send her hair to the Little Princess Trust, to have her tresses turned into a wig for another little girl, she is hoping to raises money for the Little Princess Trust to help them buy another wig.

It takes roughly £300 to create a wig, so if Amelia can exceed her £200 target, she could also raise enough to buy a second wig for a very ill child.

One thing is for sure, later today Amelia will feel like a superstar as she will be watched by all of the children and staff at Oakgrove Primary School as the hairdresser applies the scissors to her hair.

The 11-year-old is not alone in her quest to help children with cancer and fundraise. Her mother Rachael Shipley and her Auntie Sonia Ratcliffe will also be having their hair cut in a show of solidarity and they have also pledged to help Amelia fundraise.

Commending her niece for her bravery, Sonia said: “Amelia’s hair is almost 10 inches long. The school have kindly allowed us to organise it so that Amelia can have her hair cut off at school in front of the other children in the assembly hall. Ai think they are planning to do it either at assembly or a bit later at 10.30am.

“I think she is very brave to be having her hair all cut off in front of the whole school, but everyone will be cheering her on. It is a lovely thing she is doing, helping a child who had suffered hair loss because they are ill and we are very proud of her,” she said.

Ms Ratcliffe continued: “The family have been taking donations from friends and family members and we are hoping to raise a bit more money for the Little Princess Trust. I think Amelia and her mummy had hoped to raise £200 to help the charity buy a wig, but as far as I know I think they had £150 in donations already, so we may get more than our target. It would be wonderful if we did.”

The Little Princess Trust relies solely on the efforts of enthusiastic community fundraisers and receives no formal funding and as the charity is keen to work with members of the public and volunteers to help families affected by cancer in childhood Amelia’s contribution will be welcomed.