You’re going to die two years earlier than NI average in Londonderry, the top death spot for heart/lung illness

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Londonderry remains the foremost death spot for heart and lung diseases, according to a new analysis of the constituency produced by the Northern Ireland Assembly’s Research and Information Service.

The in-depth report reveals you’re still more likely to die from heart disease, stroke, pneumonia and bronchitis in Londonderry, than anywhere else in Northern Ireland.

In terms of circulatory disease, the researchers report that: “Foyle had the highest age standardised mortality rate due to circulatory disease (2008-2012).

“The age standardised mortality rate due to circulatory disease (2008-2012) in Foyle was 374 per 100,000 persons – 454 for males and 308 for females.

“The age standardised mortality rate due to circulatory disease (2008-2012) in Foyle was higher than the Northern Ireland rate of 334 per 100,000 persons.”

Lung diseases are also more lethal to citizens of Londonderry than to their counterparts elsewhere.

“Foyle had the highest age standardised mortality rate due to respiratory disease (2008-2012),” the researchers state.

“The age standardised mortality rate due to respiratory disease (2008-2012) in Foyle was 201 per 100,000 persons – 225 for males and 180 for females.

“The age standardised mortality rate due to respiratory disease (2008-2012) in Foyle was higher than the Northern Ireland rate of 156 per 100,000 persons,” they add.

The researchers also report a higher prevalence of some chronic conditions here compared with elsewhere.

“As at March 31, 2015, there was a higher prevalence of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, epilepsy, and mental health issues amongst patients whose GP practice is located in the Foyle area compared to GP practices across all of Northern Ireland,” the analysis reveals.

However, there was good news in terms of a range of other chronic illnesses.

“There was a lower prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, obesity and atrial fibrillation amongst patients whose GP practice is located in the Foyle area compared to GP practices across all of Northern Ireland.”

But the overall picture in terms of health inequality here is alarming.

Women die two years younger on average - at 80.7 years of age compared with 82.4 years-of-age - than across Northern Ireland as a whole.

Only in West Belfast do women die younger than in Londonderry.

Men here also die almost two years younger on average - at 76.5 years of age compared with 78.1 years-of-age - than across Northern Ireland.

Only in West and North Belfast do men die younger.

Meanwhile, Londonderry also had the fourth highest standardised cancer incidence rate he third highest age standardised mortality rate due to cancer (2008-2012).

According to the constituency profile: “The standardised cancer incidence rate for Foyle for the period 2006-2012 was 598 per 100,000 persons (651

for males compared to 562 for females).

“The standardised cancer incidence rate was higher for Foyle than the Northern Ireland rate of 567 per 100,000 persons.

“The age standardised mortality rate due to cancer (2008-2012) in Foyle was 317 per 100,000 persons – 378 for males and 280 for females.

“The age standardised mortality rate due to cancer (2008-2012) in Foyle was higher than the Northern Ireland rate of 292 per 100,000 persons.

Foyle had the third highest age standardised mortality rate due to cancer (2008-2012).”