RTE visit for Monreagh

Producer Mary Boyd and Religious Programmes Director Michael Sweeney with Organist Winnie McCracken, her husband Ian, an elder in Monreagh and Reverend Dr David Latimer.
Producer Mary Boyd and Religious Programmes Director Michael Sweeney with Organist Winnie McCracken, her husband Ian, an elder in Monreagh and Reverend Dr David Latimer.

It was a momentous weekend for Rev Dr David Latimer, Minister of First Derry and Monreagh, who accompanied over 50 parishoners to Dublin to take part in a special, televised Religious Service.

The programme was aired on Sunday and Dr Latimer described it as “very successful” for all involved.

Members of the Monreagh Congregation in the audience at the RTE Studios.

Members of the Monreagh Congregation in the audience at the RTE Studios.

In all 54 people from the congregation of Monreagh travelled to the RTE TV Studios in the Irish capital, and the show was aired at 11.10am. A central component of the service was an Act Of Remembrance, involving the laying of a poppy wreath during which Monreagh piper David Middleton played a lament.

The service was conducted by Dr David Latimer, assisted by members of Monreagh church, who sang and were in the audience, while organist Winnie McCracken was the accompanist for the service.

Among the people the group met were Producer Mary Boyd and Religious Programmes Director Michael Sweeney and the Organist Winnie McCracken and her husband Ian, an elder in Monreagh, are pictured right with Dr Latimer during their visit. Other photos of the event are included online at www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk, which show members of Monreagh in the audience.

“Reports from around the country reveal the Remembrance Service has been widely appreciated by the people of Ireland’s two main traditions,” said a pleased Dr Latimer on Monday.

Mrmbers of Monreagh Congregation singing at the service which as broadcast on RTE on Sunday.

Mrmbers of Monreagh Congregation singing at the service which as broadcast on RTE on Sunday.

“This unique event embraced by Monreagh provided another important opportunity for a Northern voice to speak to a Southern audience about the ‘bigger picture’ of a culture of commemoration, which embraces understanding of each other, acceptance and mutual respect.”