MNDA event in memory of Tony

Gerry O�"Connor and Christine O�"Connor
Gerry O�"Connor and Christine O�"Connor

Local estate agent Gerry O’Connor recently held a high-profile fundraising event at Titanic Belfast to celebrate the life of his brother Tony O’Connor.

Leading business figures throughout Northern Ireland attended the event which raised over £100,000 for the Motor Neurone Disease Association(MNDA) and Project MinE.

Stephen Thompson, MNDA Chairperson, Christine OConnor, Gerry OConnor and S�le Carney from Prof. Orla Hardiman's MND Research Team at Trinity College.

Stephen Thompson, MNDA Chairperson, Christine OConnor, Gerry OConnor and S�le Carney from Prof. Orla Hardiman's MND Research Team at Trinity College.

The event was held in memory of Tony O’Connor, a respected businessman within the commercial property sector in Northern Ireland at OKT (O’Connor Kennedy Turtle).

Commenting on the event which attracted 550 people, Gerry O’Connor said: “This event was a tribute to my brother Tony and was about raising much needed funds for both care and research.

“There will be a cure someday and we are determined to contribute towards that.

“Both myself and Christine O’Connor, Tony’s wife, and her family Jill, Helen and Peter are delighted at the amount of money raised at the event and we would like to thank everyone who supported and contributed to such a fantastic evening.”

The money raised will go towards both the Motor Neurone Disease Association(MNDA) and Project MinE.

The Motor Neurone Disease Association (MNDA) not only supports research into the disease but also contributes to patient care, including providing MND specialised equipment to sufferers, which is not available from statutory sources but which may enhance the quality of life of someone coping with the illness.

Project MinE is a large-scale research initiative, based at Trinity College Dublin, devoted to discovering the genetic cause of MND.

Motor neurone disease (MND) describes a group of diseases that affect the nerves (motor neurones) in the brain and spinal cord that tell muscles what to do.

MND can affect how a person walks, talks, eats, drinks and breathes.

Some people also experience changes to their thinking and behaviour.

MND is life-shortening and there is no cure. It affects up to 5,000 adults in the UK at any one time. The disease is more common in men than women, but this evens out with age.