Maiden City Great War Roll of Honour Part 25

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Local historian Trevor Temple chronicles the individuals associated with Londonderry who lost their lives in WWI.

Long, Private Thomas, 4168

Thomas Long, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Glendermott, County Londonderry, enlisted at Strabane, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

Aged 18, he was the son of Mr Long, 10, Foyle View, and brother of Susan Deeney, Gate Lodge, Braehead, Londonderry.

Prior to the Great War, Private Long had been employed with R. Colhoun, Builder.

His name is commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

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Undated handout photo issued by Roy Chamberlain of Shepreth Cambridgeshire, of injured servicemen with nurses in the village hall at Shepreth, Cambridgeshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday January 6, 2011. Villagers have found the family of a First World War soldier who lost a postcard while being treated in a military hospital nearly a century ago. The card - sent to Private (Drummer) Edward Wolstencroft of the Royal Fusiliers by a woman called Nellie in April 1915 - was spotted by workers fixing the floor at the village hall, three weeks ago. Records show that the hall was used as a military hospital between 1915 and 1919. Locals think the card was placed on a shelf then slipped behind wooden panelling. Research revealed that Pte Wolstencroft, who came from Edmonton, Middlesex, died on July 7, 1916 during the Battle of the Somme when he was in his mid 20s. Pte Wolstencroft's nephew, 61-year-old Paul Wolstencroft, was traced by local amateur family researcher Chris East.

BLACK AND WHITE ONLY Undated handout photo issued by Roy Chamberlain of Shepreth Cambridgeshire, of injured servicemen with nurses in the village hall at Shepreth, Cambridgeshire. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Thursday January 6, 2011. Villagers have found the family of a First World War soldier who lost a postcard while being treated in a military hospital nearly a century ago. The card - sent to Private (Drummer) Edward Wolstencroft of the Royal Fusiliers by a woman called Nellie in April 1915 - was spotted by workers fixing the floor at the village hall, three weeks ago. Records show that the hall was used as a military hospital between 1915 and 1919. Locals think the card was placed on a shelf then slipped behind wooden panelling. Research revealed that Pte Wolstencroft, who came from Edmonton, Middlesex, died on July 7, 1916 during the Battle of the Somme when he was in his mid 20s. Pte Wolstencroft's nephew, 61-year-old Paul Wolstencroft, was traced by local amateur family researcher Chris East.

McConnellogue, Private Henry (Harry), 7239

Henry McConnellogue, Signaller, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

Aged 27, he was the eldest son of James and Catherine McConnellogue, and brother of Miss May McConnellogue, 189, Lecky Road, Londonderry.

He was also the brother-in-law of Robert Starrett, 30, Sloan’s Terrace, and other members of his family resided at 107, Foyle Road, Derry. His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial. Private McConnellogue had been at the Front since August 1914.

McGonigle, Sergeant John Johnstone, 9565

John Johnstone McGonigle, ‘D’ Company, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Templemore, County Londonderry, enlisted at Omagh, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

Aged 26, he was son of Robert and Eliza Jane McGonigle, 39, Bellevue Avenue, Londonderry – Eliza Jane possibly died on July 26, 1919, and was interred in Glendermott New Cemetery.

Sergeant McGonigle was, in addition, the husband of Beatrice L. McGonigle, Newpass Lodge, Rathowen, County Westmeath.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and on the Christ Church (Church of Ireland), Londonderry, World War 1 Memorial.

His name is also commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

McGowan, Private Joseph, 2255

Joseph McGowan, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was a resident of 46, Ferguson Street, and a brother-in-law of Patrick McIntyre, 10, Donegal Place, Londonderry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

McHugh, Private William, 6998

William McHugh, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Londonderry, enlisted at Glasgow, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was a son of Andrew and Barbara McHugh, and his name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

McLaughlin, Private John, 3857

John McLaughlin, ‘B’ Company, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died in hospital of wounds and gas poisoning (sustained at Festubert) on May 16, 1915. Aged 23, he was the youngest son of John and Roseanne McLaughlin, 3, Eglinton Terrace, Derry.

He was also the husband of Mrs McLaughlin, 1, Carlisle Pass, Derry, and his name is recorded on Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

His name is also commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Private McLaughlin, who enlisted in the Inniskillings about six months before his death, had only been in the firing line a couple of weeks.

McLeod, Private Daniel, 2189

Daniel McLeod, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Templemore, County Londonderry, enlisted at Glasgow, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915. Aged 34, he was the son of Daniel and Anne Jane McLeod, and brother of Catherine McLeod, 39, Rossville Street, Derry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

McNamee, Private Henry, 3740

Henry McNamee, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Drumkeen, County Donegal. He came to Derry as a child, enlisted there, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915. Aged 21, he was the son of James and Mary McNamee, 4, Nailor’s Row, and brother-in-law of Mary J. McNamee, 7, Nailor’s Row, Derry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

McNulty, Private Robert, 3908

Robert McNulty, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was the son of Robert McNulty, 20, Stanley’s Walk, and husband of Mrs Mary Ann McNulty, 16, Fulton Place, Londonderry.

He was also the brother of Sarah Baldrick, 47, Rossville Street, Londonderry.

Private McNulty’s name is commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial, and his remains are interred in Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, Pas de Calais, France.

McVeigh, Private John, 4557

John McVeigh, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was the husband of Margaret McVeigh, 19, Albert Place, Londonderry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Maguire, Lance Sergeant Hugh, 3695

Hugh Maguire, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was the son of Mary Anne Maguire, 1, Fulton Place, and husband of Mrs Annie Maguire, 216, Lecky Road, Derry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Molloy, Private Bernard, 4306

Bernard Molloy, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was the son of Edward Molloy, 28, Walker’s Place, Londonderry. His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Morrison, Private William, 10581

William Morrison, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was born at Milford, County Donegal. He came to the city of Londonderry at the age of three, enlisted there, and died at Festubert on May 16, 1915. He was the brother of Andrew Morrison, 25, Lewis Street, Londonderry, and his name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. His name is also commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Mowbray, Sergeant Thomas, 4662

Thomas Mowbray, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915.

He was a member of Ebrington Presbyterian Church, Londonderry, and brother of Mr Robert Mowbray, 88, Glendermott Road, Londonderry. He was also brother-in-law of Alexander Mills, 6, Orchard Row, Londonderry.

His name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

Sergeant Mowbray was a well-known and popular figure in football and athletic circles in the North West, being a member of the old North End team.

He was the battalion gymnasium instructor, and took a prominent part in the athletics of the battalion.

He had over twenty-one years’ service, spending fifteen years in India and some time in Egypt.

He was in India at the time of the South African War, and accompanied one of the later drafts to the Transvaal. He had the South African (Queen’s) Medal, with two clasps; The North West Indian Frontier Medal, with two clasps; and the Meritorious Service Medal.

He was only a month out in France when he was killed.

Norris, Private David, 4149

David Norris, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died at Festubert on May 16, 1915. Aged 19, he was the son of Mrs Matilda Norris, 68, Glendermott Road, Waterside, Londonderry, and William Norris – who possibly died on September 27, 1909, and was buried in Glendermott Burying Ground.

Private Norris’s name is recorded on the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and commemorated on the Diamond War Memorial.

He was a member of the Murray Club of Apprentice Boys of Derry, and the first member of that Club to be killed in the 1914-18 War.

At a meeting of the Murray Club held in the Apprentice Boys of Derry Memorial Hall, on Friday, June 4, 1915, it was proposed ‘that the Secretary be instructed to forward a letter of sympathy to the relatives of the late Bro. David Norris of Glendermott Road, who was killed in action at the Front.

Put to the Club and passed in silence by the members standing.’