Gov should copy singers of bloody republican anthem

"Leclerc" tanks drive down the Champs Elysees avenue  during the Bastille Day military parade, Friday July 14, 2006 in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

"Leclerc" tanks drive down the Champs Elysees avenue during the Bastille Day military parade, Friday July 14, 2006 in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

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David Cameron should follow the lead of English football fans, who sang the bloody republican anthem, La Marseillaise, in solidarity with the victims of the Paris massacres last November, when he is trying sell the European Union to Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom.

That’s according to Lord Boswell, Chair of the House of Lords EU Committee, who said: “The Government will try to convince the people, and to do that it needs to aim higher and wider than the terms of the deal, appealing to the values that we share with our compatriots in the EU.

“It needs to try to capture the spirit that we saw in Wembley last year, when England football fans sang the Marseillaise after the attacks in Paris.”

He made the comments as the Committee published its ‘EU referendum and EU reform’ report examining the Government’s objectives on EU reform, and how they evolved in the run up to the negotiations in Brussels in February, as well as the negotiating process, and the most effective way of presenting its vision to the country.

“Our role as a Committee is not to take a view on whether or not the UK should remain in the EU.

“That choice is for the people. But we do scrutinise the Government, and it is our job to challenge the Government over the way in which it is presenting its case for remaining in the EU.”

“So we have explored the Government’s objectives for reforming the EU, the long-term vision that underlies those reforms, and the way in which it is trying to carry the people of the UK along with it. The Committee concludes that the Government will need allies from across the political parties. That means it will need to communicate a positive vision of what the EU can be in order to convince people to vote yes. Playing on voters’ fears may not be enough. There is a real opportunity now, in the wake of the deal struck in Brussels, that the UK can show leadership in helping to make the EU a more flexible, dynamic and competitive place.”