‘El Chapo’ arrest put in context by Void exhibition

ALTERNATIVE CROP OF RLB111.- Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted by army soldiers  to a waiting helicopter, at a federal hangar in Mexico City, Friday, Jan. 8, 2016. The world's most wanted drug lord was recaptured by Mexican marines Friday, six months after he fled through a tunnel from a maximum secuirty prison in a made-for-Hollywood escape that deeply embarrassed the government and strained ties with the United States. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
ALTERNATIVE CROP OF RLB111.- Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted by army soldiers to a waiting helicopter, at a federal hangar in Mexico City, Friday, Jan. 8, 2016. The world's most wanted drug lord was recaptured by Mexican marines Friday, six months after he fled through a tunnel from a maximum secuirty prison in a made-for-Hollywood escape that deeply embarrassed the government and strained ties with the United States. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

With the arrest of Mexican drug lord Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán punters still have a few weeks to visit Brian Maguire’s exhibition: ‘J’ACCUSE:’ Paintings, Ciudad Juárez’ at the Void.

The work - curated by Jonathan Cummins - will be showing until February 6.

‘J’ACCUSE’ interrogates the international war on and for drugs, the violence of a destabilised state and the darkness that permeates borderlands and trade between wealthy and poorer nations.

The new work extends Maguire’s investigation into the nature of violence in Juarez, which started with his work with the mothers and families of the victims from El Paso’s twin town, which has been plagued by high murder rates over the past decade.