Campbell raises Argentina situation

File photo dated 24/05/1982 of an Argentinian bomb exploding on board HMS Antelope off the Falklands. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 18, 2012. Thirty years ago the Falkland Islands suddenly went from being a forgotten corner of what remained of the British Empire to a dramatic test of the UK's global power status.  The remote group of boggy, windswept islands in the South Atlantic, whose 1,800 human inhabitants were vastly outnumbered by sheep, became a battleground between the ambitions of Argentina's military junta and the steely determination of Margaret Thatcher. Simmering diplomatic tensions over the ownership of the Falklands boiled over in the spring of 1982 and Argentine forces invaded the islands they call the Malvinas.  In response, Britain launched its biggest naval operation since the Second World War, sending a task force of 27,000 personnel and more than 100 ships to retake the territory. Lasting just 74 days, the Falklands War claimed the lives of more than 900 people. See PA
File photo dated 24/05/1982 of an Argentinian bomb exploding on board HMS Antelope off the Falklands. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 18, 2012. Thirty years ago the Falkland Islands suddenly went from being a forgotten corner of what remained of the British Empire to a dramatic test of the UK's global power status. The remote group of boggy, windswept islands in the South Atlantic, whose 1,800 human inhabitants were vastly outnumbered by sheep, became a battleground between the ambitions of Argentina's military junta and the steely determination of Margaret Thatcher. Simmering diplomatic tensions over the ownership of the Falklands boiled over in the spring of 1982 and Argentine forces invaded the islands they call the Malvinas. In response, Britain launched its biggest naval operation since the Second World War, sending a task force of 27,000 personnel and more than 100 ships to retake the territory. Lasting just 74 days, the Falklands War claimed the lives of more than 900 people. See PA

DUP MP Gregory Campbell has raised the potential for conflict with Argentina with the Defence Secretary Michael Fallon who has advised him contingency plans are in place for such an eventuality.

The East Londonderry MP asked: “What flexibility is there in our defence preparations for any potential hardening of attitude by Argentina, either unilaterally or with others?”

Mr Fallon replied: “We have a number of contingency plans, which we continue to refresh, to deal with any increase in the threat level.

“I am sure that the hon. Gentleman will understand that I am not able to spell them out to the House in public session, but I assure him that those contingency plans exist. We take them out every so often to ensure that they are appropriate to the existing level of threat.”